Tuesday, November 22, 2005

The Airport

I like Airports. I think they are sociologically interesting spaces; places where diverse human emotions and interpersonal attitudes come into expression. Some people gaze at the terminal gate in hopeful anticipation, scanning every face that passes by. Some even have flowers in their hands. Others spend the last moments with their friends and family, knowing the days of separation will start soon.

On Sunday, I accompanied a friend of mine to the Airport. She came to visit me on Friday and was then on her way to South Africa. We were standing in the check-in line, having a conversation about my work. I heard someone speaking Farsi behind me. I took a quick look at him, and carried on with the conversation. He was a normal looking man and wore a mustache. In my quick scan, I couldn’t see who he was talking to.

A few minutes later, I turned around to check out the surrounding, when I suddenly saw him. I recognized him instantly. I looked away. Thoughts came into my mind. I knew him since I was a young boy. In a way, he represented my forgotten past, a period I had lost contact with a long time ago. I’ve always had a great amount of respect for him, and for years, I’ve been looking for an opportunity to go and see him… it never happened.

I turned around, looked into his eyes, and smiled, “Mr. Shajarian?” I heard myself saying.

Thursday, November 17, 2005

French riots



I find the French riots very disturbing, not because I live in a city with a similar ethnic composition as Paris, but because of the way the developments have been presented through the media. They’ve twisted the reality in such a way that a lot of people don’t even know why the youth in French towns are burning cars or throwing stones at the police. Of course, I’m not talking about the critical media. But hey, who looks for anything else than CNN and other crappy channels, except for a small group?

I don’t support violence against innocent citizens. But I do like the idea behind this uprising. It’s the outrage of the underclass, the oppressed, and the dominated. It’s the classic Marx’s theory put in practice. Of course, a segment of the unrest may have been caused by people who have nothing better to do, but let’s not delegitimize the protests entirely.

The way the riots have been presented in the media is, however, is a completely different story. First of all, the media have transformed the problem from an issue related to social-economical class to a multi-cultural drama. In doing this, they have placed the riots at the heart of the current public discourse in Europe about the multi-cultural society. Indeed, in the beginning, the riots were caused by “youth in underdeveloped neighborhoods”, then they suddenly changed it to “immigrant youth”, and a few days later the media were talking about “Muslim youth”. It was only then that the media could “really” blame the protesters. Within a few days time, people were already talking about the multi-cultural catastrophe in Paris, wondering why the hell these Muslims can’t integrate in their oh so great society and fearing an expansion of the riots to other European cities. The public opinion didn’t need much evidence. The fear of Muslims is intuitive, always there and easily activated. There was no mention of the fact that African French people were also taking part in the riots, no mention of the fact that those people who were screaming on streets, have been treated as second rank citizens all their lives, no mention of the fact that they have been left to perish in nasty neighborhoods with no prospect on a job or a decent life. What goes around comes around, folks!

Saturday, November 12, 2005

Cyberia

vampire666: hey there
blue_phantom: hi
vampire666: how r u doing?
la_confidential2004: is there a nice lady who wants to pm?
blue_phantom: alright. yourself?
psycho_ag left the room
vampire666: doin great. asl pls
blue_phantom: what?
lonely_gurl enters the room
vampire666: asl, age sex location
blue_phantom: 25 male fl. You?
vampire666: m too
vampire666: hey, lonely. How r u doing?

Sunday, November 06, 2005

Author unknown



Never hold your farts in... they travel up your spine, into your brain...and that's where shitty ideas come from!!